About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“We must say it plainly: the Roman rite as we knew it exists no more. It has gone. Some walls of the structure have fallen, others have been altered—we can look at it as a ruin or as the partial foundation of a new building. Think back, if you remember it, to the Latin sung High Mass with Gregorian chant. Compare it with the modern post-Vatican II Mass. It is not only the words, but also the tunes and even certain actions that are different. In fact it is a different liturgy of the Mass.”
— Fr. Joseph Gelineau (1978)

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Vexilla Regis Prodeunt (Gregorian Hymn)
published 14 February 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

309 Vexilla Regis E HAVE INCLUDED an English translation in our Vexilla Regis score below. Latin eventually became a “dead” language, but anyone associated with the Church had to learn it—as did anyone who obtained any sort of basic education.

Those who hate our Latin heritage say, “It is impossible to learn a foreign language. Period.” However, immigrants to the United States—whether from India, the Philippines, Mexico, China, or Vietnam—would explain that learning a foreign language is not “impossible.”

The Vexilla Regis as it looked in the 14th century:

      * *  PDF Download • 14th Century Manuscript (Austria)

The Vexilla Regis as it looks today:

      * *  PDF Download • Gregorian Score (February 2015)

Fr. Dominic Popplewell pointed out that, by the 14th century, the writing was not that easy to read. They were more interested in beauty. It will remembered that most of these prayers would have been memorized.

    * *  PDF Download • Organ Accompaniment “Vexilla Regis”