About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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"In accord with no. 55 of the instruction of the Congregation of Rites on music in the liturgy (March 5, 1967), the Conference of Bishops has determined that vernacular texts set to music composed in earlier periods may be used in liturgical services even though they may not conform in all details with the legitimately approved versions of liturgical texts (November, 1967). This decision authorizes the use of choral and other music in English when the older text is not precisely the same as the official version."
— Catholic Bishops for the dioceses of the United States (November, 1969)

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Vexilla Regis Prodeunt (Gregorian Hymn)
published 14 February 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

309 Vexilla Regis E HAVE INCLUDED an English translation in our Vexilla Regis score below. Latin eventually became a “dead” language, but anyone associated with the Church had to learn it—as did anyone who obtained any sort of basic education.

Those who hate our Latin heritage say, “It is impossible to learn a foreign language. Period.” However, immigrants to the United States—whether from India, the Philippines, Mexico, China, or Vietnam—would explain that learning a foreign language is not “impossible.”

The Vexilla Regis as it looked in the 14th century:

      * *  PDF Download • 14th Century Manuscript (Austria)

The Vexilla Regis as it looks today:

      * *  PDF Download • Gregorian Score (February 2015)

Fr. Dominic Popplewell pointed out that, by the 14th century, the writing was not that easy to read. They were more interested in beauty. It will remembered that most of these prayers would have been memorized.

    * *  PDF Download • Organ Accompaniment “Vexilla Regis”