About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Sacred music, being a complementary part of the solemn liturgy, participates in the general scope of the liturgy, which is the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. It contributes to the decorum and the splendor of the ecclesiastical ceremonies, and since its principal office is to clothe with suitable melody the liturgical text proposed for the understanding of the faithful, its proper aim is to add greater efficacy to the text, in order that through it the faithful may be the more easily moved to devotion and better disposed for the reception of the fruits of grace belonging to the celebration of the most holy mysteries.”
— Pope Saint Pius X

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SATB “Alleluia” By Palestrina • Brief, Easy, & Sumptuous
published 25 August 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

HEN JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH visited King Frederick II on 7 May 1747, the king gave him a challenging fugue subject, which Bach used to create gorgeous music. Something similar was done with the melody of “Ut Re Mi Fa Sol La” by the great composers. My choir has already done a version by Morales, and now we are doing one by Palestrina:

    * *  PDF Download • ALLELUIA “Ut Re Mi Fa Sol La”

By the way, both those composers—Palestrina & Morales—wrote full Masses in which the theme constantly appears in the most ingenious ways.


The following rehearsal videos provide Solfège versions, and I believe that using Solfège will allow you to teach your choir this piece in no time flat. (Pardon the pun!)


Rehearsal Videos :

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio   incl. Solfège

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio   incl. Solfège

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio   incl. Solfège

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio   incl. Solfège


You owe it to yourself to sing through the Alto line … such fun!