About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“I have, on the other hand, retained several more or less traditional tunes, absolutely valueless and without merit from a musical point of view, but which seem to have become a necessity if a book is to appeal—as I hope this one will—to the varied needs of various churches.”
— A. Edmonds Tozer (1905)

ABOUT US  |  HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Lest we forget
published 25 April 2015 by Veronica Brandt

Rosemary HIS MORNING I ATTENDED an ANZAC Day Dawn Service for the first time. A majority of my offspring helped with enthusiasm for getting up while it was still dark, having an early breakfast and heading off bundled up in hats and scarves. We arrived just a little after they started, joining a crowd of well over a hundred people around the Cenotaph.

It was an impressive but simple ceremony. Encouraging solemnity in a public space in Australia is no mean feat, but there are well known traditions which give the framework which elevates the simple, heartfelt speeches into a moving tribute to our fallen service men and women.

You can read more about Anzac Day from the Australian Army. Although I had not attended a Dawn Service before I was familiar with the Last Post, laying wreaths, the silence, the National Anthem from other sources. It is a common canon of ritual which speaks louder than words.