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"Upon the road, René was always occupied with God. His words and the discourses he held were all expressive of submission to the commands of Divine Providence, and showed a willing acceptance of the death which God was sending him. He gave himself to God as a sacrifice, to be reduced to ashes by the fires of the Iroquois, which that good Father's hand would kindle. He sought the means to bless Him in all things and everywhere. Covered with wounds as he himself was, Goupil dressed the wounds of other persons, of the enemies who had received some blows in the fight as well as those of the prisoners. He opened the vein for a sick Iroquois. And he did it all with as much charity as if he had done it to persons who were his best friends."
— St. Isaac Jogues (writing in 1643)

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Simple English Choral Propers by Jon Naples
published 29 May 2014 by Guest Author

HIS WORK uses unaltered, the offertories of the Simple English Propers chants by Adam Bartlett. This work treats each chant as cantus firmus. Retaining the chant properties of the SEP, I have expanded each into a full blown motet.

These pieces give parish choirs of all sizes and skill levels the ability to observe the content of the propers in a polyphonic offertory. They may also serve as an excellent stepping stone for the beginning choir to approach polyphony.

      * *  Pentecost Sunday — Free PDF

      * *  Trinity Sunday — Free PDF

      * *  Corpus Christi Sunday — Free PDF

      * *  Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary — Free PDF

— The parts are generally invertible. Meaning, the women’s part(s) may be sung by men and vice versa.

— Choirs are advised to first to learn the antiphon melody in unison, then learn the verse tones in SATB, then their respective part of the polyphony.

— In the verse tones, the choir changes pitch on the words in bold type.

— In the antiphons, black notes (equal to a square note of chant) are the basic unit of time and in turn, determine the duration of the half notes, dotted half notes, and whole notes.

— The conductor is advised to observe two and three-beat groupings according to the rhythm of the text and melody combined.

— For reasons of musical interest most of the pieces contain two contrasting settings of the antiphon. Antiphon I should be heard after the odd numbered verses, and Antiphon II after the even numbered verses. Long antiphons have one setting.


We hope you enjoyed this guest post by Jon Naples.