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Gwyneth Holston is a sacred artist who works to provide and promote good quality Catholic art. Her website is gwynethholston.com.
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“I still haven’t made up my mind whether I shall publish it all. Some people are so humorless, so uncharitable, and so absurdly wrong-headed, that one would probably do far better to relax and enjoy life than worry oneself to death trying to instruct or entertain a public which will only despise one’s efforts, or at least feel no gratitude for them. Most readers know nothing about canon law. Many regard it with contempt and find everything heavy going that isn’t completely lowbrow. Some are so grimly serious that they disapprove of all humor. Others come to different conclusions every time they stand up or sit down. They seize upon your publications, as a wrestler seizes upon his opponent’s hair, and use them to drag you down, while they themselves remain quite invulnerable, because their barren pates are completely bald, so there’s nothing for you to get hold of.”
— St. Thomas More to Peter Gilles, 1516

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St. Eulalia by John William Waterhouse
published 6 January 2014 by Gwyneth Holston


GWYN_St. Eulalia


NE WAY OF getting through the hated chore of scraping ice and snow off your car is to think of Saint Eulalia. She was an early Christian martyr from Spain. At the age of 12, the emperor Maximian tried to force her to worship false idols. Rather than submit, she spat in his face and kicked over the idols, cakes and incense. She was then stripped, torn with hooks, and burnt. According to tradition, a dove flew out of her mouth as she died, symbolic of her soul flying to heaven. God then commanded snow to fall in order to provide her with suitable raiment.

A painting by John William Waterhouse commemorates the moment just after her death. Her white skin still glows with a fading warmth against the white snow. Both Roman soldiers avert their gaze, but bystanders have fallen upon their knees in recognition of the saint. A young boy points out a white dove to us, the viewers.

Waterhouse was daring in his composition. The center of the painting is almost entirely empty. Or is it? I would argue that the focal point of this painting is the snow itself. The color of her robe cannot be accidental. Indeed, it immediately brings to mind the words from Isaias 1:18, “...if your sins be as scarlet, they shall be made as white as snow.” Her heroic example can inspire us to act with a holy impudence whether we battle heresy or winter ennui.