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"Father Isaac Jogues was truly a martyr before God, rendering witness to Heaven and earth that he valued the Faith and the propagation of the gospel more highly than his own life, and losing it in the dangers into which, with full consciousness, he cast himself for Jesus Christ…" — Fr. Jerome Lalemant (writing in 1647)
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“I vividly remember going to church with him in Bournemouth. He was a devout Roman Catholic and it was soon after the Church had changed the liturgy (from Latin to English). My grandfather obviously didn't agree with this and made all the responses very loudly in Latin while the rest of the congregation answered in English. I found the whole experience quite excruciating, but my grandfather was oblivious. He simply had to do what he believed to be right.”
— Simon Tolkien (2003)

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The Smoke Of Satan
published 3 September 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

On 19 April 1967, Pope Paul VI wrote the following to the Consilium:

N EVEN GREATER source of sorrow is the inclination of some to deprive the liturgy of its sacred character — to “desacralize” it (if we can even call it liturgy anymore). This necessarily leads to the desacralization of the Christian religion as well. This new outlook whose sordid roots are easy to discern, would destroy authentic Catholic worship. It leads to doctrinal, disciplinary and pastoral subversions of such magnitude that we do not hesitate to consider it deviant. We say this with sadness, not only because it evinces a spirit that runs counter to canon law, but also, because it necessarily involves the disintegration of religion.

On 5 September 1970, the Sacred Congregation for Divine Worship issued Liturgicae Instaurationes, and here’s an excerpt:

HE LITURGICAL REFORM bears absolutely no relation to what is called “desacralization” and in no way intends to lend support to the phenomenon of “secularizing the world”. Accordingly the rites must retain their dignity, spirit of reverence, and sacred character.

The effectiveness of liturgy does not lie in experimenting with rites and altering them over and over, nor in a continuous reductionism, but solely in entering more deeply into the word of God and the mystery being celebrated. It is the presence of these two that authenticates the Church’s rites, not what some priest decides, indulging his own preferences.