About this blogger:
Richard J. Clark has served since 1989 as Music Director and Organist at Saint Cecilia Church in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also Chapel Organist (Saint Mary’s Chapel) at Boston College. For the Archdiocese of Boston, he directed the Office of Divine Worship Saint Cecilia Schola. His compositions have been performed on four continents.
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"Since such is the nature of man that he cannot easily without external means be raised to meditation on divine things, on that account holy Mother Church has instituted certain rites, namely that certain things be pronounced in a subdued tone (canon and words of consecration) and others in a louder tone; she has likewise made use of ceremonies such as mystical blessings, lights, incense, vestments, and many other things of this kind in accordance with apostolic teaching and tradition, whereby both the majesty of so great a sacrifice might be commended, and the minds of the faithful excited by these visible signs of religion and piety to the contemplation of the most sublime matters which are hidden in this sacrifice."
— Council of Trent (Session XXII)
Free Communion Propers for Advent
published 8 November 2013 by Richard J. Clark

UPDATE (2014) THIS COLLECTION IS NO LONGER ONLINE. IT IS BEING REVISED AND WILL BE REISSUED FOR PUBLICATION IN 2015. UPDATES WILL BE FORTHCOMING. — RJC

NFUSE CHANT WITH SOME PASSION! Energico e con moto is occasionally a helpful marking for Gregorian Chant or chant-inspired liturgical works. Chant must not be lethargic, plodding and boring. It can be tranquil at times, but always with movement. The texts are transformative. They propel us forward in spiritual maturity and closer to God. Keep moving forward and keep growing!

Free Download:
PDF • “Advent Communion Propers”
(for Schola, Organ, SATB)

• All are chant based.

• Includes communion propers for the four Sundays of Advent.

• Includes a setting for the Immaculate Conception on page 9. This year it falls on the Second Sunday of Advent (December 8th). Therefore, the Immaculate Conception is shifted to Monday, December 9th. My fellow blogger, Andrew Motyka brilliantly explains some interesting quirks of the liturgical calendar including information that pertains to the Immaculate Conception in his post Juggling Holy Days of Obligation.

• Can be sung with cantor or schola with organ. There is opportunity for optional SATB singing, designed to offer contrast with unison singing.

• Congregation inserts for worship aids found after page 9

THESE SETTINGS, LIKE MANY of my liturgical works, at times “float” around traditional harmony, “bending” not so much with dissonance, but hopefully with carefully placed color. This at times is to convey an ethereal tone, yet hopefully without drawing too much attention to itself.

In the end, I hope these are useful, prayerful, reverent, and with a bit of passion!