About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“Indeed, we may not hope for real Latin poetry any more, because Latin is now a dead language to all of us. However well a man may read, write, or even speak Latin now, it is always a foreign language to him, acquired artificially. It is no one's mother tongue. Does a man ever write real poetry in an acquired language?”
— Rev’d Adrian Fortescue (d. 1923)

ABOUT US  |  HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Funerals and Last Things
published 11 November 2013 by Veronica Brandt

grave stone E ARE DOOMED! These words would often be on our lips back in high school in the lead up to exams. Usually followed by despairing moans of “I’m dead!” Sometimes we would go off on tangents of planning our hypothetical funerals, what flowers, what music, etc.

Melodramatic teens aside, funerals are serious occasions. The Church has a wealth of traditions for the occasion. In reality it can be a very turbulent and emotional time. Having stable, familiar, unchanging plans in place can be very reassuring, rather than the pressure to be original and creative.

Here is a fantastic run down on the issues around your average Catholic funeral today by Monsignor Charles Pope:

Funeral Foibles. How many Catholic funerals lack balance and do not teach clearly on the Last Things