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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“I should not like to be too harsh on this commission’s labors. It numbered a certain number of genuine scholars and more than one experienced and judicious pastor. Under different circumstances, they might have accomplished excellent work. Unfortunately, on the one hand, a deadly error in judgment placed the official leadership of this committee in the hands of a man who—though generous and brave—was not very knowledgeable: Cardinal Larcaro. He was utterly incapable of resisting the maneuvers of the mealy-mouthed scoundrel that the Neapolitan Vincentian, Annibale, a man as bereft of culture as he was of basic honesty, soon revealed himself to be.”
— Fr. Bouyer, a liturgical expert appointed by Pope Paul VI

A Papal Blessing
published 14 March 2013 by Fr. David Friel

HE EXCITEMENT we’ve all seen on the faces of people in St. Peter’s square the last few days is appropriate. It is never good for a family to be without a father for long, so joy and gladness are the right reaction to the election of a new Holy Father (even during Lent).

One of the moments that seems to have most moved onlookers was the new Pope’s request for the prayers of the people before giving his first Apostolic blessing. Two things impressed me about this particular action.

First, the pope asked for God’s blessing. Speaking in Italian, the new Holy Father said, “Pray to the Lord so that He blesses me.” As he embarks on his new mission, Pope Francis realizes that he needs the blessing of Almighty God. I pray that he will have it.

Secondly, the pope asked for our prayers. Notably, he did not ask for the blessing of the crowd. Blessings come to us only from God directly or through the hands of an ordained minister. But the prayers of our brothers and sisters in Christ are, indeed, powerful.

That moment of prayer on the balcony of St. Peter’s is very similar to an exchange that occurs four times in every Mass. When the priest says, “The Lord be with you,” it is really a prayer, asking that God would be present with all those in attendance. The people respond, also, with a prayer: “And with your Spirit.” The people’s prayer asks that the Lord would be with the minister, particularly in his role as a minister—a “steward of the mysteries of God” (1 Corinthians 4:1).

This action is bound to be interpreted variously. I see in it an expression of prayerful Christian solidarity ordered toward the reception of a unique blessing. May God’s blessing, which has come to us at the hand of Pope Francis, bring forth abundant fruit.