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"Father Isaac Jogues was truly a martyr before God, rendering witness to Heaven and earth that he valued the Faith and the propagation of the gospel more highly than his own life, and losing it in the dangers into which, with full consciousness, he cast himself for Jesus Christ…" — Fr. Jerome Lalemant (writing in 1647)
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Dale uses an Italian name on every possible occasion… […] In Dale, you do not bow to the celebrant, you “proceed to make the customary salutation”; you do not stand, you “retain a standing posture.” Everyone “observes” to do everything: you observe not to kneel, you observe to retain a kneeling posture. The MC does not tell a man to do a thing, he apprizes him that it should he performed. The celebrant “terminates” the creed; he genuflects in conjunction with the sacred ministers—then he observes to assume a standing posture in conjunction with them. The MC goes about apprizing and comporting himself till he observes to perform the customary salutation. The subdeacon imparts the Pax in the same manner as it was communicated to him. Everyone exhibits a grave deportment; Imagine anyone talking like this. Imagine anyone saying that you ought to exhibit a deportment.
— Fr Adrian Fortescue

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Msgr. Wadsworth to help found new Oratory in D.C.
published 9 June 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

HE CHURCH OF SAINT Thomas the Apostle in Washington D.C. [url], which seems to be an incredibly vibrant Catholic parish, will soon have a new Pastor.  Father Richard Mullins has reported that starting 10 July 2013 he will be “planting the seeds for an eventual Oratory of St. Philip Neri” as Pastor of St. Thomas.

Helping him in this task will be none other than Monsignor Andrew R. Wadsworth, Executive Director of ICEL. Corpus Christi Watershed has written about Msgr. Wadsworth here.

This is certainly exciting news for anyone interested in the Roman Rite, since Oratorian priests are known as the “special protectors of the liturgy” in the same way the Benedictines used to be (but, sadly, are no longer).