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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“One would be straying from the straight path were he to wish the altar restored to its primitive table form; were he to want black excluded as a color for the liturgical vestments; were he to forbid the use of sacred images and statues in Churches; were he to order the crucifix so designed that the divine Redeemer's body shows no trace of His cruel sufferings; and lastly were he to disdain and reject polyphonic music or singing in parts, even where it conforms to regulations issued by the Holy See.”
— Ven. Pope Pius XII (20 November 1947)

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Warring Gods
published 8 January 2013 by Fr. David Friel

TUDYING THE ANCIENT GREEK & ROMAN GODS can be fascinating. Looking at their stories, though, reveals a rather violent worldview. They had gods of war, for instance; in Greece, there were Ares & Athena, and, in Rome, there were Mars & Minerva. The stories of the gods are filled with anger, vengeance, jealousy, adultery, fury, and wrath. Since these gods were the conception of those ancient people, they reflect a culture of darkness and severity.

In this milieu, Saint John dared to write his luminous First Letter. He had the audacity to claim that “God is love” (1 John 4:8). Moreover, “In this is love: not that we have loved God, but that He has loved us and sent His Son as expiation for our sins” (1 John 4:10).

The Christian worldview is utterly revolutionary.