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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“I grew up listening to Lessons & Carols from Cambridge and that was Advent-Christmas for me. Then I moved to Rome and discovered Rorate Masses, the Novena of the Immaculate Conception with the Tota Pulchra, the Christmas Novena, the O Antiphons, the Aspiciens, the Rorate Coeli, the Alma Redemptoris Mater: that's Advent for me now. I am glad to see seminarians all over the United States doing Lessons & Carols, but are they learning our ancient Roman traditions alongside a 20th-century Anglican one?”
— Rev. Christopher Smith

Warring Gods
published 8 January 2013 by Fr. David Friel

TUDYING THE ANCIENT GREEK & ROMAN GODS can be fascinating. Looking at their stories, though, reveals a rather violent worldview. They had gods of war, for instance; in Greece, there were Ares & Athena, and, in Rome, there were Mars & Minerva. The stories of the gods are filled with anger, vengeance, jealousy, adultery, fury, and wrath. Since these gods were the conception of those ancient people, they reflect a culture of darkness and severity.

In this milieu, Saint John dared to write his luminous First Letter. He had the audacity to claim that “God is love” (1 John 4:8). Moreover, “In this is love: not that we have loved God, but that He has loved us and sent His Son as expiation for our sins” (1 John 4:10).

The Christian worldview is utterly revolutionary.