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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“From six in the evening, his martyrdom had continued through the ghastly night until nine o'clock in the morning. After fifteen hours of torture rarely if ever surpassed in the bloody annals of the Iroquois, the soul of Gabriel Lalemant was freed from its charred and mutilated prison and summoned to join his comrade Jean de Brébeuf in the radiant splendor of God. March 17th, 1649, was the date; for Brébeuf it had been the sixteenth.”
— Fr. John A. O'Brien, speaking of St. Gabriel Lalemant

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Warring Gods
published 8 January 2013 by Fr. David Friel

TUDYING THE ANCIENT GREEK & ROMAN GODS can be fascinating. Looking at their stories, though, reveals a rather violent worldview. They had gods of war, for instance; in Greece, there were Ares & Athena, and, in Rome, there were Mars & Minerva. The stories of the gods are filled with anger, vengeance, jealousy, adultery, fury, and wrath. Since these gods were the conception of those ancient people, they reflect a culture of darkness and severity.

In this milieu, Saint John dared to write his luminous First Letter. He had the audacity to claim that “God is love” (1 John 4:8). Moreover, “In this is love: not that we have loved God, but that He has loved us and sent His Son as expiation for our sins” (1 John 4:10).

The Christian worldview is utterly revolutionary.