About this blogger:
Ronda Chervin received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Fordham University and an MA in Religious Studies from Notre Dame Apostolic Institute. A widow, mother, and grandmother, she currently teaches philosophy at Holy Apostles College and Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut. Write to her at chervinronda@gmail.com.
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“One would be straying from the straight path were he to wish the altar restored to its primitive table form; were he to want black excluded as a color for the liturgical vestments; were he to forbid the use of sacred images and statues in Churches; were he to order the crucifix so designed that the divine Redeemer's body shows no trace of His cruel sufferings; and lastly were he to disdain and reject polyphonic music or singing in parts, even where it conforms to regulations issued by the Holy See.”
— Ven. Pope Pius XII (20 November 1947)

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Attitudes toward Ministry
published 1 January 2013 by Dr. Ronda Chervin

A priest who teaches seminarians was giving a lecture to them about wrong ways to minister. I happened to sit in on the class and I took notes on points that seemed to me to apply not only to priests but to all Catholics in leadership.

To summarize some of the points made:

The priest is a mediator between the people and God out of love, not out of power. He is not “the king of kings,” but the footwasher.

He will not be afraid that his weaknesses will be manifest, but, instead, should evangelize through his weaknesses as a wounded healer not as the judge; listening to what they say and what they don’t say. [I didn’t take this to mean that the priestly ministry does not include teaching and judging in the confessional, etc. but that these should not be done either out of a sense of power but out of love.] The pastor should not make it seem as “if you disagree with me, you are in trouble.” He should not appear as a know-it-all. Some priests seem like giants of intellect but dwarves in the heart.

If the priest realizes that he has been wounded, then he puts himself in the shoes of those also wounded. He should not think of others as sick and dysfunctional, but as vulnerable brothers. They are dealing with their hurt. The Church is not a democracy, but also not an aristocracy. The middle ground is ministry of love.