About this blogger:
Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward a doctorate in liturgical theology at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“I still haven’t made up my mind whether I shall publish it all. Some people are so humorless, so uncharitable, and so absurdly wrong-headed, that one would probably do far better to relax and enjoy life than worry oneself to death trying to instruct or entertain a public which will only despise one’s efforts, or at least feel no gratitude for them. Most readers know nothing about canon law. Many regard it with contempt and find everything heavy going that isn’t completely lowbrow. Some are so grimly serious that they disapprove of all humor. Others come to different conclusions every time they stand up or sit down. They seize upon your publications, as a wrestler seizes upon his opponent’s hair, and use them to drag you down, while they themselves remain quite invulnerable, because their barren pates are completely bald, so there’s nothing for you to get hold of.”
— St. Thomas More to Peter Gilles, 1516

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Divine Intimacy
published 3 February 2013 by Fr. David Friel

E THINK WE KNOW PEOPLE. All of us do. Maybe it’s a spouse or a roommate or a best friend. We think we know them because we know their handwriting; we know their pet words & phrases; we can predict the play-by-play of their morning routine; we can identify a sweater as theirs just by the smell; we can recognize their footsteps coming down the staircase.

Every single one of us has a few people in our lives that we know that well. But even all that, I daresay, is shallow by comparison to the way we are known by God.

The thirteenth chapter of the First Letter to the Corinthians is home to the famous passage that begins, “Love is patient, love is kind.” After all the talk about love, St. Paul goes into a comparison between life on Earth and life in heaven. He says: “At present I know partially; then I shall know fully, as I am fully known” (1 Corinthians 13:12).

So many people wander through life longing to feel like somebody truly knows and understands them, with all their intricacies and subtleties. To be “fully known” by God must be an extraordinary sensation! The good news is that we don’t have to wait to get to heaven to experience it. God has known us fully since the moment He created us. As He says to the Prophet Jeremiah: “Before I formed you in the womb, I knew you; before you were born, I dedicated you” (Jeremiah 1:5).

Is it possible to reach a very deep level of intimacy with a human person? Absolutely. But no human relationship can measure up to the incomparable intimacy we have with God, Who knows us better than we know ourselves.