About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and six children.
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“Sacred music, being a complementary part of the solemn liturgy, participates in the general scope of the liturgy, which is the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. It contributes to the decorum and the splendor of the ecclesiastical ceremonies, and since its principal office is to clothe with suitable melody the liturgical text proposed for the understanding of the faithful, its proper aim is to add greater efficacy to the text, in order that through it the faithful may be the more easily moved to devotion and better disposed for the reception of the fruits of grace belonging to the celebration of the most holy mysteries.”
— Pope Saint Pius X

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What not to do on GitHub
published 24 August 2013 by Veronica Brandt

OME MIGHT SAY, DON’T DO ANYTHING on GitHub. After the last few hours I can relate to that, but there is more to it than that. GitHub is a great platform for all sorts of development. Here are a few of my favourites:

Adam Wood wrote CMAA: Now with 100% more GitHub a few months ago. The idea was to have a place to share music transcriptions. There are already many places offering music in print-ready form, but not so many with editable scores in open formats. If you’ve ever had to adjust a score or a booklet and faced retyping the whole thing from scratch, you’ll know that being able to edit documents is very valuable.

So what is GitHub anyway?

Git is a version control system. GitHub is a big shiny website where you can sign up and use git to manage projects. You can Try Git in 15 minutes or sit back and watch some videos.

And what shouldn’t you do on GitHub?

Well, I was going to write a warning against deleting your repositories, because if you delete then try to make a new one with the same name, the system says you already have a repository with that name. I thought there may have been some permanent invisible archive there. Turns out it just takes a while for the repository to delete. Try again in an hour or two and everything is fine.

So, what not to do?

  • Don’t jump to conclusions.

  • Don’t dismiss the whole thing because it’s hard.

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask questions.

To follow my confusion see veromary at GitHub. I have a few projects I’m working on, and I hope to write more about them later.