About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
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“In 1854 John Mason Neale co-founded an order of women dedicated to nursing the sick. Many Anglicans in his day, however, were very suspicious of anything suggestive of Roman Catholicism. Only nine years earlier, John Henry Newman had encouraged Catholic practices in Anglican churches and had ended up becoming a Roman Catholic. This encouraged the suspicion that anyone such as Neale was an agent of the Vatican, assigned to destroy Anglicanism by subverting it from within. Once, Neale was attacked and mauled at a funeral of one of the Sisters. From time to time unruly crowds threatened to stone him or to burn his house.”
— Unknown Source

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What not to do on GitHub
published 24 August 2013 by Veronica Brandt

OME MIGHT SAY, DON’T DO ANYTHING on GitHub. After the last few hours I can relate to that, but there is more to it than that. GitHub is a great platform for all sorts of development. Here are a few of my favourites:

Adam Wood wrote CMAA: Now with 100% more GitHub a few months ago. The idea was to have a place to share music transcriptions. There are already many places offering music in print-ready form, but not so many with editable scores in open formats. If you’ve ever had to adjust a score or a booklet and faced retyping the whole thing from scratch, you’ll know that being able to edit documents is very valuable.

So what is GitHub anyway?

Git is a version control system. GitHub is a big shiny website where you can sign up and use git to manage projects. You can Try Git in 15 minutes or sit back and watch some videos.

And what shouldn’t you do on GitHub?

Well, I was going to write a warning against deleting your repositories, because if you delete then try to make a new one with the same name, the system says you already have a repository with that name. I thought there may have been some permanent invisible archive there. Turns out it just takes a while for the repository to delete. Try again in an hour or two and everything is fine.

So, what not to do?

  • Don’t jump to conclusions.

  • Don’t dismiss the whole thing because it’s hard.

  • Don’t be embarrassed to ask questions.

To follow my confusion see veromary at GitHub. I have a few projects I’m working on, and I hope to write more about them later.