About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“Sacred music, being a complementary part of the solemn liturgy, participates in the general scope of the liturgy, which is the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. It contributes to the decorum and the splendor of the ecclesiastical ceremonies, and since its principal office is to clothe with suitable melody the liturgical text proposed for the understanding of the faithful, its proper aim is to add greater efficacy to the text, in order that through it the faithful may be the more easily moved to devotion and better disposed for the reception of the fruits of grace belonging to the celebration of the most holy mysteries.”
— Pope Saint Pius X

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Solesmes Salicus & Scandicus Vs. Pure Vatican Edition
published 29 April 2013 by Jeff Ostrowski

OSTING ABOUT THIS SUBJECT probably makes me an official geek, but here goes. Those who carefully examine yesterday’s Communion Proper (5th Sunday of Easter, Year C) will notice that there are major discrepancies between how it is printed in the ORDO CANTUS MISSAE and the Solesmes Gregorian Missal of 1989. The ORDO CANTUS MISSAE was printed in 1970, 1974, and again in 1988. There are so many important discrepancies, I will not show them, because it would take too long. However, the excerpts below serve as good examples of what I’m talking about. The RED ARROWS are from the ORDO CANTUS MISSAE (1988) and the PURPLE ARROWS are from the Gregorian Missal:

Errors like these happen approximately five times, which is quite remarkable considering Ego Sum Vitis Vera is an extremely short chant. Anyone who has read my article in Sacred Music (Winter 2008) realizes the deep significance of these discrepancies. Furthermore, they would be easier to account for if the chant were printed by the Pothier Commission, but this chant was first added in 1970.

Here’s my 2008 article, for those who care:

      * *  The Rhythm of the Vatican Edition (Winter 2008) [pdf]

And here’s a series of videos you can watch, if the article doesn’t make sense to you:

      * *  Video Presentation on the Vatican Rhythm of the Chant

But the easiest way to understand what I’m talking about is to read “Lesson 8” found here:

      * *  How to Read and Sing Gregorian Chant

Happy Geek-ing!!!