About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“We must say it plainly: the Roman rite as we knew it exists no more. It has gone. Some walls of the structure have fallen, others have been altered—we can look at it as a ruin or as the partial foundation of a new building. Think back, if you remember it, to the Latin sung High Mass with Gregorian chant. Compare it with the modern post-Vatican II Mass. It is not only the words, but also the tunes and even certain actions that are different. In fact it is a different liturgy of the Mass.”
— Fr. Joseph Gelineau (1978)

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Graduale Romanum Chants And The New Roman Missal
published 19 November 2012 by Jeff Ostrowski

OR SEVERAL YEARS, Christoph Tietze along with many others have been trying to explain why the antiphons in the Graduale Romanum do not always match the antiphons in the Roman Missal. I, myself, have attempted to explain this in a series of articles [url] posted on the CCW website. However, it would seem that a whole lot of confusion still exists. For instance, today on the Musica Sacra Forum (which I visit quite frequently) some correspondence with the USCCB Committee on Divine Worship was posted here [jpeg] and here [jpeg]. To make a long story short, the Committee itself does not seem to be cognizant of the reason for discrepancies between some antiphons in the Graduale Romanum and the Roman Missal. I have to admit I am surprised to hear this, because several organizations have written to the Committee about this over the years, including the Roman Catholic Cathedral Musicians [homepage], and the relevant quote from Pope Paul VI is even printed in the front of the Roman Missal, 3rd Edition.

They are certainly not alone. One of the great liturgical scholars of all time, Professor László Dobszay, did not understand why the differences exist. I say this based on my understanding of part of his 2003 article [pdf] in the Sacred Music Journal, an excerpt of which I reproduce here:

As a matter of fact, there is a very good reason why these discrepancies exist. SHORT ANSWER: the antiphons in the Roman Missal were only to be used for “Masses without music” according to Pope Paul VI.

* For those who desire to learn more, please consider reading a series of articles [url] I have posted online.