About this blogger:
Ronda Chervin received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Fordham University and an MA in Religious Studies from Notre Dame Apostolic Institute. A widow, mother, and grandmother, she currently teaches philosophy at Holy Apostles College and Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut. Write to her at chervinronda@gmail.com.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
At the Council of Trent, the subject was raised whether it was correct to refer to the unconsecrated elements of bread and wine as “immaculata hostia” (spotless victim) and “calix salutaris” (chalice of salvation) in the offertory prayers. Likewise the legitimacy of the making the sign of the cross over the elements after the Eucharistic consecration was discussed.
— Fr. Uwe Michael Lang, Cong. Orat.

   Send an E-mail to Dr. Ronda Chervin, Ph.D.
Day 42: The Challenge of Offering Every Sacrifice to God for a whole day
published 20 January 2012 by Dr. Ronda Chervin

What you will read now is part of a series of 100 spiritual challenges. Each blog can be viewed separately, but for maximum benefit a reader needs to start with the introductory blog of November 18, 2011, and then continue step by step. Day One begins on Sunday, November 20, 2011.
    [ Click here for 100 STEPS ]

“Bear one another’s burdens…” Galatians 6:2

Dr. Ronda’s examples: Alarm didn’t wake me. I woke up late with only ½ hour max to get ready and drive 20 minutes away but I did it as a tiny sacrifice of going without my wake-up tea. Regular confessions are from 4 PM – 4:45 PM on Saturdays. Since the Church is 20 minutes away I thought of asking the priest, who is also a good friend, to hear my confession after the morning Mass. I hesitated because I feel uneasy asking any “father figure” for favors. Then I thought that if the priest chooses to hear confessions only once a week it is good for him to be eager to hear confessions when people want to go during the week. It was a sacrifice to overcome my hesitancy in the fear of annoying the priest. As it turned out he was as pleasant as can be about it. I felt very happy because I find it awful when lay people are afraid of the priest concerning asking him to do things that are part of his role. I called someone who wrote a real letter for Christmas vs. one of the letters sent to 500 friends and relatives. (I see that writing these each year is good for families to do, but sending them to people that you never contact between one Christmas and the next who hasn’t seen you or talked to you on the phone or e-mailed you for 10 years doesn’t seem to require a personal answer.) I tried to make bread with my daughter’s new bread-maker even though I was afraid of lousing it up since the directions disappeared with Christmas wrap. The sacrifice is to tackle tech stuff even if I might feel stupid. I called a friend who misses me since I will be gone for awhile from being near to her. I took a little walk even though I don’t like exercise that much because it’s good for me. I wrote a letter of amends to someone who might be angry at me.

Your examples:

Prayer: Thank you, Holy Spirit, for inspiring me to put this theme of making sacrifices into the Way of Love: Step by Step. I dislike lazy self-centeredness in others, so I should be willing to make sacrifices myself without lethargy or depressed feelings. Can you remind me when this week is over?

Read more blog entries by Dr. Ronda Chervin by visiting RondaView. Dr. Ronda Chervin has many free e-books and audios on her website, rondachervin.com. If you go to her website and read or listen and then want to correspond with her she will be available. Her schedule does not permit, however, responding to comments on the Blog, though she enjoys reading them. Dr. Ronda’s newest project is spiritualityrunningtogod.com.

Watershed Blogs:    RondaView    •    Main    •    Priesthood    •    Liturgy    •    Music