About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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"And since it is becoming that holy things be administered in a holy manner, and of all things this sacrifice is the most holy, the Catholic Church, to the end that it might be worthily and reverently offered and received, instituted many centuries ago the holy canon, which is so free from error that it contains nothing that does not in the highest degree savor of a certain holiness and piety and raise up to God the minds of those who offer."
— Council of Trent (1562)

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Learn A New Word, See It Within 24 Hours (3)
published 13 January 2012 by Jeff Ostrowski

In the past, I’ve commented on the fact that when one encounters a new word, one will see it again within 24 hours. This phenomenon continues in my life constantly. It can be anything: a famous person, an item like “pedialyte,” etc.

Recently, I was speaking to a friend who was going through the Latin Graduale Romanum with me. He pointed out the Christmas Morning Mass (“Mass at Dawn”) and reminded me that “aurora” means “dawn” in Latin. Within 24 hours, I saw it again. Click here to see.

There is another phenomenon I’ve observed. Clicking the link above, you will notice that Badura-Skoda mentions the Beethoven “Waldstein” Sonata (4th movement). I’ve noticed that whenever my mind sees a word it instantly recalls the music. No matter how long it has been since I have heard that particular movement, my brain instantly starts “inwardly” replaying the music as soon as my eyes read the title. I have always found this interesting.

I have been quite ill this week, but I hope to find time to add a blog about Josef Hofmann before too long. As many of you know, Hofmann’s art has been a passion of mine since I was very young. (This entry would not be related to Catholic music, by the way. This would simply be commenting on great art.)