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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“Since the ability of Francisco Guerrero is now abundantly known to all […] he shall henceforth act as master of the boys so long as: ( 1) he must teach them to read, write, and to sing the responsories, versicles, antiphons, lessons, and kalends, and other parts of divine service; (2) he shall teach them plainchant, harmony, and counterpoint, his instruction in counterpoint to include both the art of adding a melody to a plainsong and to an already existing piece of polyphonic music; (3) he shall always clothe them decently and properly, see that they wear good shoes, and ensure that their beds are kept perfectly clean; (4) he shall feed them the same food that he himself eats and never take money from them for anything having to do with their services in church or their musical instruction…” [cont’d]
— Málaga Cathedral Document (11 September 1551)

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Advent vs. the Saints
published 14 December 2012 by Fr. David Friel

DVENT IS MY FAVORITE SEASON. Bar none, I like Advent better than any other liturgical season. I like the waiting, the stillness, the longing anticipation; I like the interplay of light and darkness, hope and anxiety, immanence and apocalypse. Advent, although so brief, is a season filled with rich meaning and sacramental symbols.

I also love the saints. Some years more than others, however, these two loves seem in conflict with each other. This year, for instance, in less than two full weeks of Advent, we’ve already celebrated eight memorials of the saints. Much as I love the saints, it feels at times like we can’t really get into celebrating Advent.

So today I resolved to celebrate in my heart both St. John of the Cross and Advent by finding something that would link them. I found this excerpt from the saints poem, On the Incarnation:

          Men sang songs
          and angels melodies.
          But God there in the manger
          cried and moaned;
          and those tears were jewels
          the bride brought to the wedding.
          The Mother gazed in sheer wonder
          on such an exchange:
          In God, man’s weeping,
          and in man, gladness;
          to the one and the other
          things usually so strange.

What a remarkable reflection! On Christmas morning, for which we now prepare, Christ will be seen sharing in our sorrows in this valley of tears. Perhaps even more fantastically, if we prepare well, we will be seen sharing in the joyous strains of the heavenly choirs. What beneficent surprise!