About this blogger:
Ronda Chervin received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Fordham University and an MA in Religious Studies from Notre Dame Apostolic Institute. A widow, mother, and grandmother, she currently teaches philosophy at Holy Apostles College and Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut. Write to her at chervinronda@gmail.com.
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“Philip the presbyter and legate of the Apostolic See said: There is no doubt, and in fact it has been known in all ages, that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, pillar of the faith, and foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior and Redeemer of the human race, and that to him was given the power of loosing and binding sins: who down even to today and forever both lives and judges in his successors. The holy and most blessed pope Celestine, according to due order, is his successor and holds his place, and us he sent to supply his place in this holy synod.”
— Council of Ephesus (A.D. 431)

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Changing language; changing thoughts
published 31 July 2011 by Dr. Ronda Chervin

Years ago I tried writing a book called Screwtape Comes to the Seminary based on Lewis’ famous Screwtape Letters. In one of the chapters I explained how each of the polarized groups in the Church has it’s own language so that you can tell very a quickly where a person is coming from based on phrases he or she uses often. For example, contrast Mother Mary with the Holy Immaculate Virgin.

Recently the one I am noticing is how in some circles “sin” went from being called “problem” to now being called “issue.” As in she or he has an issue where previously it was called he or she is lazy or rude.

The intent is often to be charitable. To say someone is lazy or rude sounds so blunt and judgmental! God forbid we would use the word “fat.” It is certainly true that some of us, mea culpa, who tend toward harsh judgment will use the worst word possible to describe others we disapprove of, and we need to realize this is not charitable!

So? I suggest that when talking about our own sins we break the euphemism habit by using the real word. It will be a step out of denial as in “I am a chatter-box,” “I am a gloomy party-pooper,” “I am a smotherer micro-manager.”

Then we can enjoy the response which is usually, “Aw, come on Ronda, after all, you also have lots of virtues, otherwise we wouldn’t love you so much.”

Read more blog entries by Dr. Ronda by visiting RONDAVIEW. Dr. Ronda Chervin has many free e-books and audios on her website rondachervin.com. If you go to her website and read or listen and then want to correspond with her she will be available. Her schedule does not permit, however, responding to comments on the Blog, though she enjoys reading them. Dr. Ronda’s newest project is spiritualityrunningtogod.com.