About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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"Upon the road, René was always occupied with God. His words and the discourses he held were all expressive of submission to the commands of Divine Providence, and showed a willing acceptance of the death which God was sending him. He gave himself to God as a sacrifice, to be reduced to ashes by the fires of the Iroquois, which that good Father's hand would kindle. He sought the means to bless Him in all things and everywhere. Covered with wounds as he himself was, Goupil dressed the wounds of other persons, of the enemies who had received some blows in the fight as well as those of the prisoners. He opened the vein for a sick Iroquois. And he did it all with as much charity as if he had done it to persons who were his best friends."
— St. Isaac Jogues (writing in 1643)
Entrance Antiphons by Richard Rice
published 7 February 2011 by Jeff Ostrowski

World renowned chant expert and composer Richard Rice has done it again! He has just set to music the official Entrance Antiphons of the Catholic Mass for the entire Liturgical year (for voice, with optional organ accompaniment). Purchase the entire collection for just $5.00. Visit Richard Rice’s Website. Download a PDF Sample of this new collection.

Here is the Foreword:

As one more addition to the growing repertoire of sung English Propers, I submit this collection of Entrance Antiphons for the Sundays and Solemnities of the Church Year.

From the official texts, as found in the Graduale Romanum and the Roman Missal, I have extracted short refrains suitable for congregational singing. The formulaic modal melodies will be familiar to those who have sung my Responsorial Psalm settings (Chabanel Responsorial Psalm Project, chabanelpsalms.org). In the few cases where the texts of the Graduale and Missal differ, I have included both options, and leave the choice up to the music director.

Verses may be sung by a schola or cantor. The melodies are loosely adapted from the Invitatory tones found in the Liber Hymnarius (1983), and the verses follow their threepart structure. Texts for the verses are taken from The Psalter (The Grail, 1963). Because I have kept the refrains short, I have also tried to include the full text of the authentic Introit chant as one of the verses whenever possible.

For each of the five modes represented in the collection, I have included a setting in English of the Gloria Patri, traditionally sung as the final verse. Its use is optional, and should depend on the length of the procession.

— Richard Rice
February 2011

Entrance Antiphons by Richard Rice