About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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Giovanni Doni is known for having changed the name of note “Ut,” renaming it “Do.” He convinced his contemporaries to make the change by arguing that 1) “Do” is easier to pronounce than “Ut,” and 2) “Do” is an abbreviation for “Dominus,” the Latin word for the Lord, Who is the tonic and root of the world. There is much academic speculation that Giovanni Doni also wanted to imprint himself into musical canon in perpetuity because “Do” is also ulteriorly an abbreviation for his family name.
— Giovanni Battista Doni died in 1647AD
Gospel Acclamation During Lent
published 28 February 2011 by Jeff Ostrowski

During Lent, both before and after the Gospel Acclamation, instead of “Alleluia,” any of the following phrases may be used:

    Praise to you, O Christ, king of eternal glory!
    Praise and honor to you, Lord Jesus!
    Glory and praise to you, O Christ!
    Glory to you, O Christ, you are the Word of God!
    Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ, king of endless glory!

To access hundreds of free organist and vocalist scores, training videos, congregational inserts, and many more resources for the Gospel Acclamation, please visit this website: St. Charles Garnier Free Gospel Acclamations.

Here’s an example of how an ancient Gregorian manuscript indicated the tone: (click here)

Here’s an example of how the monks of Solesmes do the same thing: (click here)

And here’s a VIDEO of how Corpus Christi Watershed does the same thing for the Lenten Gospel Acclamation “Praise to you, O Christ, king of eternal glory!”: (click here)