About this blogger:
Ronda Chervin received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Fordham University and an MA in Religious Studies from Notre Dame Apostolic Institute. A widow, mother, and grandmother, she currently teaches philosophy at Holy Apostles College and Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut. Write to her at chervinronda@gmail.com.
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“Although the mass contains great instruction for the faithful people, nevertheless, it has not seemed expedient to the Fathers, that it should be every where celebrated in the vulgar tongue. Wherefore, the ancient usage of each church, and the rite approved of by the holy Roman Church, the mother and mistress of all churches, being in each place retained; and, that the sheep of Christ may not suffer hunger, nor the little ones ask for bread, and there be none to break it unto them, the holy Synod charges pastors, and all who have the cure of souls, that they frequently, during the celebration of mass, expound either by themselves, or others, some portion of those things which are read at mass, and that, amongst the rest, they explain some mystery of this most holy sacrifice, especially on the Lord's days and festivals.”
— Council of Trent (17 September 1562)

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Hurling Denunciations from the Throne of Truth
published 25 February 2011 by Dr. Ronda Chervin

I sometimes ask myself: “If I lived at the time of Jesus would I have been a zealot or a Christian?” Probably a zealot before the Resurrection and a Christian afterwards. After all, the zealots were haters of the real injustices of the Romans and, by contrast, Jesus must have seemed weakly passive in this respect.

Dietrich Von Hildebrand wrote a great analysis of the Pharisee in his classic Transformation in Christ. A key concept is that in pride we love to hurl denunciations from the throne of truth. In our own personal lives this takes the form of “This person is unforgivable. Here are the 20 examples of his/her unforgivableness. Now, all of you need to hate him or her, also.” And then we add, “I could forgive him/her if that person begged for forgiveness and that, in a totally sincere manner.”

Whenever I see the Passion Christ when Jesus forgives his torturers I say to myself: “If He could forgive them, and they certainly weren’t begging for forgiveness, I can forgive everyone who hurt me.” Legend has it that not only the centurion but even Pilate got the grace to repent. Since forgiveness from the heart can take many years, it’s better to start soon.

Well, when we say every day many times “forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us” do we mean it or is it just lip-service?

Dr. Ronda has many free e-books and audios on her website rondachervin.com. If you go to her website and read or listen and then want to correspond with her she will be available. Her schedule does not permit, however, responding to comments on the Blog, though she enjoys reading them.