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At the Council of Trent, the subject was raised whether it was correct to refer to the unconsecrated elements of bread and wine as “immaculata hostia” (spotless victim) and “calix salutaris” (chalice of salvation) in the offertory prayers. Likewise the legitimacy of the making the sign of the cross over the elements after the Eucharistic consecration was discussed.
— Fr. Uwe Michael Lang, Cong. Orat.
Stand Up For Truth!
published 8 August 2011 by Guest Author

Before formulating a daily homily on a feast day I read what authoritative sources have to say about an individual saint, it helps remind me of the most significant contributions that person made to the Church and what lesson their life might help illustrate. Today the Church celebrates the feast of St. Dominic, the founder of the Order of Preachers, more widely known as the Dominican Order. While reading a brief biography of St. Dominic I read that one of his most important missions in the Church was his battle against the Albigensian heresy.

Now, to must make a public confession, although I did very well in seminary, and I’m sure we covered Albigensianism in one of my classes, this particular heresy wasn’t one I was recalling. So, I did what any modern, newly-ordained priest does when confusion arises…I ‘Googled’ the term. What I found was that the Albigensian heresy basically taught a dualistic approach to creation; that things proper to the spiritual life are good whereas those things in the material world are bad.

As I reflected on the mission of Saint Dominic to combat this heresy I was struck by just how much the modern Christian can learn from the example he gave. We live in a time where truth is often rejected, where society has shown itself capable and willing of ignoring the behavioral norms that have sustained us for millennia. Reflecting on the life of Saint Dominic each of us should be left with the question, ‘How can I lead others to truth? How can I help lead others back to Christ?’

Furthermore, all of us should take the opportunity to pray in thanksgiving for the dedicated men and women of the Dominican community, many of whom I took classes from during my years of formation. Saint Dominic…pray for us!

—A Newly Ordained Priest