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Father Charles Garnier, the Apostle to the Hurons and the Petuns, has left a memory of exceptional heroism. In the last moments of the agony that ended in his death, he tried with his waning energies to save the soul of another.
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Using the shoddiest, sleaziest material we have for the purpose of glorifying God is not very sound theology or even very good common sense. […] (In general, when you see a diminished seventh chord in a hymn, run.) And these chords are usually used in bad hymns in precisely the same order in which they occur in “Sweet Adeline.”
— Paul Hume (1956)
Gospel Acclamations
published 18 October 2010 by Corpus Christi Watershed


THE LINKS BELOW DO NOT WORK.

Instead, try: Garnier Alleluia Website, 2017


Great progress has been made on a brand new Watershed site, called St. Charles Garnier Gospel Acclamations. Some people call this site Garnier Alleluias, because ninety percent of the time, the Gospel Acclamation is an “Alleluia.” There is, however, no Alleluia during the holy season of Lent.

Here is a beautiful example of a Garnier Gospel Acclamation by one of our guest composers, Aristotle Esguerra:

St. Charles Garnier Gospel Acclamations already offers hundreds of examples like that one, in addition to Mp3’s, PDF’s, congregational JPG’s, and other media. All these are available for free and instant download, as part of Corpus Christi Watershed’s ministry.

Here is an example of a practice video for an Alleluia melody in honor of William Couture, who suffered for the Faith alongside St. Isaac Jogues and the other Jesuit Martyrs of North America. Note that the verse teaches cantors how to apply the tone:

If you have not already done so, please check out garnieralleluias.org.