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Father Charles Garnier, the Apostle to the Hurons and the Petuns, has left a memory of exceptional heroism. In the last moments of the agony that ended in his death, he tried with his waning energies to save the soul of another.
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“In spite of what it is currently called, the music of these songs is not modern: this musical style is not new, but has been played in the most profane places and surroundings (cabarets, music halls, often for more or less lascivious dances with foreign names). The people are led on to rock or swing. They all feel an urge to dance about. That sort of “body language” is certainly alien to our Western culture, unfavorable to contemplation and its origins are rather suspect. Most of the time our congregations, which already find it hard not to confuse the crochets and the quavers in a 6/8 bar, do not respect the rhythm; then one no longer feels like dancing, but with the rhythm gone to pieces, the habitual poorness of the melodic line becomes all the more noticeable.”
— Unnamed choirmaster (Northern France) circa 1986

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Gospel Acclamations
published 18 October 2010 by Corpus Christi Watershed

THE LINKS BELOW DO NOT WORK.

Try: Garnier Alleluia Website, 2017


Great progress has been made on a brand new Watershed site, called St. Charles Garnier Gospel Acclamations. Some people call this site Garnier Alleluias, because ninety percent of the time, the Gospel Acclamation is an “Alleluia.” There is, however, no Alleluia during the holy season of Lent.

Here is a beautiful example of a Garnier Gospel Acclamation by one of our guest composers, Aristotle Esguerra:

St. Charles Garnier Gospel Acclamations already offers hundreds of examples like that one, in addition to Mp3’s, PDF’s, congregational JPG’s, and other media. All these are available for free and instant download, as part of Corpus Christi Watershed’s ministry.

Here is an example of a practice video for an Alleluia melody in honor of William Couture, who suffered for the Faith alongside St. Isaac Jogues and the other Jesuit Martyrs of North America. Note that the verse teaches cantors how to apply the tone:

If you have not already done so, please check out garnieralleluias.org.