About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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The effectiveness of liturgy does not lie in experimenting with rites and altering them over and over, nor in a continuous reductionism, but solely in entering more deeply into the word of God and the mystery being celebrated. It is the presence of these two that authenticates the Church's rites, not what some priest decides, indulging his own preferences.
— Liturgicae Instaurationes (1970)
English Martyrs & Chabanel Psalms
published 8 November 2010 by Jeff Ostrowski

Some of you may have noticed that over the last two weeks I have completely redone my contributions to Year A on the Chabanel Psalms Website. These new compositions are all being named in honor of the English Martyrs.

I’ve noticed that, quite often, the Year A Psalms have a special connection with the Saints after which they are named.

For instance, the antiphon “I love you, Lord, my strength” was named in honor of Blessed John Beche (†1539), an Abbot who was hung, drawn, and quartered. Blessed John Beche, then, knew well the meaning of the prayer that proclaimed God as our strength. Blessed Beche also showed that he loved God, by suffering so much.

Another example would be this Psalm:

God the LORD has spoken and summoned the earth,
from the rising of the sun to its setting.
“Not for your sacrifices do I rebuke you,
for your holocausts are before me always.”

“If I were hungry, I would not tell you,
for mine are the world and its fullness.
Do I eat the flesh of strong bulls,
or is the blood of goats my drink?”

“Offer to God praise as your sacrifice
and fulfill your vows to the Most High;
then call upon me in time of distress;
I will rescue you, and you shall glorify me.”

. . . named in honor of Blessed Thomas Johnson (†1537), a Carthusian monk who was starved to death.

I hope you will take the time to explore Year A on the Chabanel Psalms Website.