About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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Much of the beauty of the older forms was lost and the hymns did not really become classical. We have reason to hope that the present reform of the breviary will also give us back the old form of the hymns. But meanwhile it seems necessary to keep the later text. This is the one best known, it is given in all hymnbooks and is still the only authorized form. Only in one case have we printed the older text of a hymn, number 57, “Urbs Jerusalem.” The modern form of this begins: “Caelestis urbs Jerusalem.” But in this case the people who changed it in the seventeenth century did not even keep its metre; so the later version cannot be sung to the old, exceedingly beautiful tune.
— Fr. Adrian Fortescue (1913)
Roger Wagner Interview
published 7 November 2010 by Jeff Ostrowski

Here is a 45-page interview with Roger Wagner (PDF) dating from 1960, published in the 1962 edition of Caecilia.

The interview is excellent. I was especially pleased to read the history behind his recording of Palestrina’s Pope Marcellus Mass, which was one of the first recordings I ever heard by Roger Wagner. As a matter of fact, that recording and Wagner’s unique approach was the inspiration for my Renaissance Gloria adaptation featured on the Summi et Aeterni CD.

He also utters several “Wagnerian” phrases. I’ve had the privilege of working with many of Wagner’s colleagues and friends, and so it is fun to read the phrases coming from Wagner himself (as opposed to being quoted by his friends). One that is often repeated is, “Remember: the choir is only as good or bad as its conductor.”

This interview is courtesy of the Church Music Association of America. The Church Music Association of America has made available many rare chant PDF’s, very similar to the hundreds of thousands of pages of Gregorian accompaniments, treatises, and editions Watershed has made available at The Lalande Library.

At the end of the interview, you may find yourself exclaiming (as did I), “What a remarkable person was Roger Wagner!”