About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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“The main place should be given, all things being equal, to gregorian chant, as being proper to the roman Liturgy. Other kinds of sacred music, in particular polyphony, are in no way excluded, provided that they correspond to the spirit of the liturgical action and that they foster the participation of all the faithful.”
— 2011 GIRM, §41 (Roman Missal, 3rd Edition)
Confusion Abounds
published 5 November 2010 by Jeff Ostrowski

Recently, the Church Music Association posted a series of tutorials on how to sing the New ICEL English Translation Chants of the Mass: Video Tutorials on how to sing the New Missal Translation.

Some folks still seem to be confused as to why the new Missal chants do not contain the “Solesmes” dots and dashes.

For those who understand what the Editio Vaticana is, where it came from, and why it came about in the first place, the answer is obvious.

However, if you are not familiar with this history, you may want to read the following article (PDF).

N.B. A version of this article appeared in SACRED MUSIC JOURNAL several years ago: (see page 21) PDFSCRIBD

You also might enjoy this series of seven videos, which explains all about the Editio Vaticana.