About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“How can we enter into this interior disposition except by turning physically—all together, priest and faithful—toward the Lord who comes, toward the East symbolized by the apse where the cross is enthroned? The outward orientation leads us to the interior orientation that it symbolizes. Since apostolic times, Christians have been familiar with this way of praying. It is not a matter of celebrating with one’s back to the people or facing them, but toward the East, «ad Dominum», toward the Lord.”
— Robert Cardinal Sarah, Prefect of the Vatican's Congregation for Divine Worship (October 2016)
Confusion Abounds
published 5 November 2010 by Jeff Ostrowski

Recently, the Church Music Association posted a series of tutorials on how to sing the New ICEL English Translation Chants of the Mass: Video Tutorials on how to sing the New Missal Translation.

Some folks still seem to be confused as to why the new Missal chants do not contain the “Solesmes” dots and dashes.

For those who understand what the Editio Vaticana is, where it came from, and why it came about in the first place, the answer is obvious.

However, if you are not familiar with this history, you may want to read the following article (PDF).

N.B. A version of this article appeared in SACRED MUSIC JOURNAL several years ago: (see page 21) PDFSCRIBD

You also might enjoy this series of seven videos, which explains all about the Editio Vaticana.