About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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"In accord with no. 55 of the instruction of the Congregation of Rites on music in the liturgy (March 5, 1967), the Conference of Bishops has determined that vernacular texts set to music composed in earlier periods may be used in liturgical services even though they may not conform in all details with the legitimately approved versions of liturgical texts (November, 1967). This decision authorizes the use of choral and other music in English when the older text is not precisely the same as the official version."
— Catholic Bishops for the dioceses of the United States (November, 1969)
A Chabanel Psalm sung A Cappella
published 14 November 2010 by Jeff Ostrowski

A cappella means “in the style of the chapel.” Today, it has come to mean “without accompaniment.” It may not be the best term, however, because sometimes instruments were used in church right along with the voices (in certain countries in certain chapels during certain time periods).

In any event, here is what a Chabanel Psalm sounds like a cappella